Saturday, April 07, 2018

links for the weekend--trying to replicate ancient Greek music, Native American art forgery, a Kubrick film at 50,

Ancient Greek music is full of puzzles and while it might be easy to suggest that we're not necessarily much closer to finding out, if ever we can, what ancient Greek music sounded like, there's some interesting sounding efforts to get at what the music would sound like.  Fortunately there's enough art depicting what instruments from ancient Greece looked like reconstruction is practical.

And since the Greeks wrote stuff down we've got theoretical treatises on language, rhythm and the like.  Aristoxenus seemed opaque and impenetrable to me when I tried reading him in college but I was an undergrad student diving into the deep end of the pool trying to read Aristoxenus! 

Anyway ...
http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20180404-why-2001-a-space-odyssey-remains-a-mystery

an altogether different kind of replicating of arts and artifacts of another culture of a more ... mercenary nature ... here's something about Native American art forgery stuff.

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/native-american-indian-art-fake-forgery-hopi-zuni0/


Stanley Kubrick's blank slate sci-fi classic 2001 turns fifty, although obviously not everyone regards it as actually being a blank slate of a film.  Here's a case for comparing 2001 to Dr. Strangelove as a political satire on technocratic optimism being undone by a combination of human error and errant computers.  When I finally saw the uncut version of 2001 it struck me as a riff on Cold War brinksmanship and deceit.  Neither the US nor the USSR wanted to let slip how much they had respectively learned about the monolith and the monolith itself resisted analysis while catalyzing changes and discoveries.  The monolith doesn't necessarily represent something clear, though, it's that when it shows up humans or proto-humans pioneer new capacities, capacities that humans or whatever they were or become, don't necessarily put to good use. 

But in the sense that Kubrick declined to say what the film was "about" it is a touchstone of film as a kind of art religion, a vacuum like the vacuum of space into which film critics and film historians can contemplate a Big Bang of speculation and interpretation.

Not exactly a Kubrick fan myself but I can admire the skill of the director while finding the cult of his fan base offputting. 

At a considerably lower level, this year's favorite for journalists as superhero films, The Post, gets a bit of a treatment below in two articles at Consortium News.  The Post had more cartoonish takes on politics and good vs. evil than any of the superhero films I saw in 2017 (to name them: Logan, Guardians of the Galaxy volume 2, Wonder Woman, Spiderman: Homecoming, and Thor: Ragnarok.  Every single one of those films had more nuanced takes on how and why people and states might choose evil than The Post.  Okay, we could rephrase it, the above-named superhero films were certainly no more cartoonish in their depiction of evil than The Post. Other than Odenkirk as Bagdikian nobody in the entire Spielberg film seemed to be playing characters so much as riffing on their own respective shticks, especially Hanks.  But if Hanks phones it in in The Post he can get praised, whereas if Jennifer Lawrence phones it in as Mystique it's just phoning it in.

So, as noted ...
 

 
 
"Big data" has been a loose term to describe the perceived economic value of massive data collection, storage and analysis that some believe has the promise of great insights and great profits but no matter how big the sample there's always room for sampling bias and assuming too much about causes and effects which gets us to ...
 
 
 
I don't think I'd say it's evangelicalism that has a culture of forgiveness.  Somebody was pardoning or looking the other way over the last twenty odd years as Weinstein was Weinstein and Bill Clinton was Bill Clinton. 

There's a pastor in Houston who's been indicted for ... well ... read for yourself.  Pastors passing themselves off as financial advisors and planners is a thing, a thing there should be less of.


 

And, of course, there's sex scandals because why wouldn't there be?
 

These are reminders, pertinent to things connected to Mark Driscoll and Mars Hill, that one of the mantras in the case of Driscoll's Richard Nixon moment as a megachurch pastor was that there was no sexual immorality or embezzlement anything going on, just a "death by a thousand cuts".  We've explored at frankly intimidating length that the death by a thousand cuts account is hardly a plausible explanation for what happened.  Years of observable double standards on the part of the leadership culture at Mars Hill on the subjects of intellectual property, real estate acquisition and municipal compliance, and consistency in the design and implementation of governance and discipline all culminated in a public relations suicide on the part of Mars Hill's top leadership. 
 
If there's a "story" to how Mars Hill collapsed part of that story is that it was a church on the leading edge of developing social media and connection systems and leveraging them as much and as hard as possible.  One of the reasons Mars Hill's implosion was so rapid and, depending on who you talk to, so painfully public was because Mars Hill had a culture in which data mining and leveraging collected information within a stratified and delineated information system meant that the top-down controls within any given silo were completely useless when former members and staff and volunteers, knowing pretty fully how this information culture worked, began to coordinate and share information.  When you dump tons of information into an online information network you can't control where it goes or how it gets used.

Which sorta gets us to things about Facebook, doesn't it?  If what happened at Mars Hill was a technocratically optimistic leadership culture dumped everything into their online networks without considering just how much potentially self-incriminating content could end up off of The City and on the general internet, the Facebook news of the last few weeks plays like a photo negative of the Mars Hill public relations suicide process--people are discovering just how much information Facebook gave away or let companies data mine or extract.  If you want to read a bit about what it means to have Facebook accounts "scraped" you can go over here.
 
 
and in the midst of all the this and that, it seems that Facebook leadership seems committed to the idea that whatever it is they do isn't really, exactly, the real problem.
 
 
 
From the outside, Facebook’s recent data-leaking problems seem to result from the tension between their business—which relies on harvesting, keeping, analyzing, and selling advertisements based on user data—and their stated goal of growing meaningful communities.
 
To this mind-set, Facebook’s privacy policies, for example, are a set of trade-offs between making money and providing a place where people are willing to share the sensitive personal information that has made Facebook the most powerful data owner on the internet. Provide too much access to advertisers or other companies and you violate user trust. Provide too little and the advertisements become less effective, making Facebook less competitive for ad dollars.
 
In a conference call with reporters on Wednesday, I asked Zuckerberg directly: “Have you ever made a decision that benefited Facebook’s business, but hurt the community?” And his response, roughly, was that he didn’t consider that set of trade-offs to be particularly difficult.
 
“The things that make our product challenging to manage and operate are not the trade-offs between people and the business. I think those are quite easy,” Zuckerberg told me. “Because over the long term, the business will be better if you serve people. I think it would be nearsighted to focus on short-term revenue over what the value to people is, and I don’t think we’re that short-sighted.”
 
Zuckerberg has referenced his near total control over the company because of an unusual stock arrangement, which he maintains insulates the company from Wall Street’s short-term whims. So, what is hard, then?
 
“All the hard decisions we have to make are trade-offs between people. One of the big differences between the type of product that we’re building, which is why I refer to it as a community, [is that] different people who use Facebook have different interests,” Zuckerberg said. “Some people want to share political speech that they think is valid and other people feel like it’s hate speech.”
 
While that is undoubtedly a difficult trade-off among 2 billion users across thousands of cultures, it struck me as glib, to borrow a word, to write off the difficulties of building a business out of people’s personal and professional relationships. When Zuckerberg’s lieutenant Andrew Bosworth wrote a controversial post in mid-2016, he even referred to specific decisions that Facebook was making to grow that might not benefit “the community.”

Yes, there was that Youtube shooting thing but we don't have to try to keep up with "everything". 

Facebook is a system that allows for the generation and dissemination of sociological propaganda and it works well at accomplishing this at a horizontal level, to borrow terms used by Jacques Ellul.  While I'm meaning to write a post or maybe two posts about this topic I don't feel like doing that today.  but the gist of what I have been saying is that if you know that Facebook and Twitter and similar platforms are sociological propaganda systems and catalysts then you can use them and know what they're for.  The reason I find Zuckerberg's blather about "community" dubious is because a virtual community on Facebook is no more plausible to me than a virtual church or a virtual city.  Yes, we live in an era where if you get sick or are out of town you can listen to sermons online.  That's fine.  That's not the same as baptism or communion, though, and it's not the same as meeting with people in person.  This is not even to denigrate technology as a connecting system.  For people who had disabilities at Mars Hill its tech-savvy second-nature could be helpful.  The trade-off, obviously, was that the kinds of modern communications networking possible in social media also allowed for an unprecedented level of administrative surveillance and oversight and this was how The City seemed to play out with its top-down administrative dynamics.

Facebook feels like a macro-level national or even international variation of the unforeseen possibilities of leveraging a mountain of information from a social network run by a leadership culture that seems kind of eager to not have to really explain itself too much to the users.  Or that's how it comes across this weekend.  Maybe next weekend Zuckerberg wil have said something so amazing it forces me and others to have a change of mind on that.   
 

a sermon Mark Driscoll preached in Wenatchee in 2016 is no longer available, partial transcript of sermon in which Driscoll referenced tree falling on his house in "Seattle"

For those who may (or may not) have read this blog post by Warren Throckmorton.

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/warrenthrockmorton/2016/02/22/brief-note-mark-driscoll-on-becoming-a-godly-man/
 
In 2016 Driscoll preached a sermon in which he mentioned something that happened to the house that he initially told Bowen was some kind of wrong address back in 2014.  Since ...
 
 
is a dead link ...

Thou Art The Man blog made mention of the sermon, and the folks over there may or may not know that the Grace City Church sermon Driscoll preached doesn't seem to be available any more. There's reference to Larry Osborne as "wise counsel", which is interesting for those familiar with the 2006-2007 governmental changes to Mars Hill because Mark Driscoll specifically name-dropped Osborne as one of his wise counsel guys from that period.  Interesting that the man would play a "wise counsel" role in the 2018 Mark Driscoll gig eleven years later.  If Larry Osborne had an advisory role in the controversial Mars Hill reorganization and bylaws revision period of 2006-2007 what's the new approach with The Trinity Church?  Or is there a new approach?

The reason it's worth looking back at a roughly two year old sermon is because ...

Driscoll shared a story about how his house was hit by a falling tree, which house? The one he told Russ Bowen was "wrong address, I don't know"?

August 29, 2014 story
http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Mars-Hill-pastor-terminated--273144811.html

That was back in 2014 and by 2015 Mark Driscoll shared at the Thrive Conference that the media showed up and blocked the driveway to the house.  If this was the house that looked pretty fully gated that Bowen couldn't even set foot on unless the gate was opened it's a little tough to see how the media could have blocked the driveway to the house if there was no indication in the KOMO coverage the gate(s) were open.  Something to keep in mind.  Something else to keep in mind is the chopper. 

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/warrenthrockmorton/2015/05/13/transcript-of-mark-driscolls-speech-at-the-thrive-leadership-conference-2015/
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1wYBTnRpPHRb8N1nqtgP2FcHcdnBeMIqCYy2SyQCEWBg/edit
http://wenatcheethehatchet.blogspot.com/2015/05/courtesy-throckmorton-thrive-transcript.html

Transcript | Mark Driscoll | Thrive 2015-05-01
See Links to Timestamps at the end of this doc.

[4:04]
Things really escalated when the media showed up and blocked the driveway to the house, seeking an interview and brought a helicopter overhead to flush me out for an interview.  My kids had been outside playing and, uh, all of a sudden we heard this helicopter over the yard and so we pulled the family into the house and tried to figure out how to not be in front of a window because we didn’t want to be on the news and didn’t know what was going on, to be honest with you. 


That night my oldest son, he was 8 at the time, he came to me downstairs, my wife Grace was cooking dinner and uh, he had on this jacket, it was a military jacket with patches down the side.  He had his AirSoft gun and I said “What are you doing little buddy?” He’s nine now.  And he said, “Dad is this jacket bullet-proof?” (crown groans) And I said, “Why’s that little buddy?” And he said, “Well, if the bad guys come, I want to be able to protect the family.” [4:59]

I didn’t know that he – he didn’t know it was a news crew. The only thing he’d ever seen were the uh, um, the bad guy movies where they come in helicopters and shoot everybody.  It took months.  He would have night terrors. He wouldn’t sleep in his room.  He wouldn’t take a shower, get dressed in his bedroom by himself. Something we’re trying to encourage him through.  Just real fear came into him.  The kids wanted to sleep outside in a tent one night.  We told them no, because as soon as we had the tent set up and were going out to sleep in the tent, the media posted the address to my house as a new story which I felt like we were in danger again so I grabbed the kids and left for the night and went to a hotel for a couple days.  Then came back and I preached what would be my last sermon -- I didn’t know it would be my last.  The New York Times was there.  It was a big media situation.


So, the kids were like, “Dad, we just want to sleep in a tent in our house.” So we slept in a tent.  I didn’t really sleep, but the kids -- the younger kids slept.  Woke up in the morning and somebody on the other side of the fence was throwing large rocks at my kids at about 6:30 in the morning.  And at first, I didn’t know what it was and then the dog thought we were playing fetch and started picking up these rocks and it dawned on me, like rocks are flying at my kids in the yard.  So we filed a police report and went away for a little bit. Came back and there was a bucket of nails all over the driveway.  Picked those up um.  ...

So if Driscoll told Bowen, "sorry, wrong address. I don't know" he can't just turn around in the next calendar year and regale an audience with how the house that wasn't his while the camera was rolling for Bowen magically became the house that had its driveway "blocked by the media".  Still less does it make sense to invoke the youngest son being afraid of "bad guys" because a news helicopter flew over the house that was "sorry, wrong address. I don't know." 

Now there was a police report filed in Woodway about harassment August 25, 2014

http://wp.production.patheos.com/blogs/warrenthrockmorton/files/2014/10/Driscoll082514policereport.png

The complaint notes that the assailant(s) were on the other side of a six-foot high wooden fence and could not be seen. 

Granting the event described as indicated on the police report, perhaps KOMO can confirm whether or not the helicopter flew over what they believed was the Driscoll residence in Woodway on the same day as the rock throwing incident. It's possible both incidents took place on 8-24-2014 but KOMO would have to confirm and they obviously havenews to cover.  Bowen isn't in the Puget Sound area any longer, if memory serves.  Working elsewhere. 

But you can work out the basic idea here, Driscoll can't claim "wrong address" on camera and then turn around in stories on the road in 2015 in which he talks about a press helicopter flying overhead or "the media" blocking the driveway to the house.  The police report mentions a six-foot tall wooden fence past which assailants could not be seen.  Bowen mentioned in the KOMO footage that a dog was being let out.  Would the Driscoll household letting out their family dog make it into the story?  Whether or not those kinds of details end up in whatever Mark Driscoll shares about his decision to start The Trinity Church in Spirit-Filled Jesus may have to wait.

With all that in mind we finally get to the now-missing 2016 sermon preached at Grace City Church in which Mark Driscoll talked about the prospect of selling that house in Woodway.  The house in Seattle proper that was at Montlake Blvd sold in December 2014 so it's literally impossible for his former Seattle house to have been on the market between January 2015 and February 2016 as it was already sold.  By the February 21, 2016 sermon Driscoll did not own real estate in Seattle city proper or in King County as best as can be confirmed by county records.  Something to keep in mind for ...

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/warrenthrockmorton/2016/02/22/brief-note-mark-driscoll-on-becoming-a-godly-man/

Throckmorton referenced the sermon but it's down. 
 
We'll have to settle for a transcript we made back in 2016 of the sermon when it was available to download.
 
http://www.gracecitychurch.com/sermon/becoming-a-godly-man/
10.00
...
I put my house on the market. I'm thinking, "Okay, my house will sell." I gotta go down and I'm--we can't get the kids into school. The school's are already full. We're there too late because the school districts are different between the northwest and the southwest. We're renting a place temporarily. All my stuff, all our stuff, is up in our place in Seattle. Our house is on the market. Our house is not selling. ...


10.35
and I was in Arizona trying to figure out what the next season of life looks like with elementary, junior high, high school, college and my phone alarm starts going off and I assume somebody broke in or whatever. So I send my realtor over. My realtor calls me and his voice is trembling and he sends me this photo. He said, "I'm standing at your house and here it is." [audience reaction of dismay, apparently at a photo] Yeah,that--that's my house. Or WAS my house. And a 200-foot tree fell on my house and crushed our bedroom. Our bed is under that rubble. If my wife and I were taking a nap at 1 o'clock on a Saturday we'd be dead.


So I flew up late at night. I go to the property all the power's out. I'm there with a flashlight. It's pouring down rain and I'm going through the rubble that is our home and I'm glad that nobody in my family died. And I'm thinking, "How--this is all my equity. This is what I was going to use to relocate and provide for my family. And, and here it is." And now I live in another state so how am I supposed to fix this?
...

11.55
I remember sitting at the house, actually, outside in the rain looking at what used to be my house.  I'm like, "Okay, Lord, this family is my responsibility." My stuff is in this house. My family is in another state. We don't have a permanent place to live. I can't find a school for my children. All of our equity and wealth is in a destroyed home and I'm unemployed. ...


13.05
And I remember just standing there in the rain just like, "Father, Dad, I need help now. I need wisdom. I need provision. I need a path forward. I accept responsibility for the well-being of my family. But how to proceed forward, Dad, I'm not entirely clear on. I could really use your help." And God's a good father and he has answered that prayer and He's taken care of our family. And, actually, the good news is we closed this  house last week and it got fixed and somebody bought it who was willing to take that off our hands and allow us to move forward with our lives.
 
It needs to be kept in mind that while Driscoll used the word "Seattle" the actual house he at one point had in Montlake went on the market in 2014.  It sold in December 2014 according to Redfin.
 
So it wasn't Mark Driscoll's house on 2904 Montlake Blvd E in 2015.  Driscoll may have felt that talking to people in Wenatchee might have meant that he could safely say "Seattle" despite the fact that literally anybody within Washington state could, if they knew who Mark Driscoll was, enquire as to whether or not he actually owned a house in Seattle.  Woodway is not Seattle.  It's not even in the same county as Seattle.  His real estate equity may have been harmed by the windstorm that hit the region a few years back but he managed to snag a whole lot of intellectual property in his departure from Mars Hill.  Nobody who has recycled as much preaching material as Mark Driscoll has from his Mars Hill days has "nothing". 

Now the Woodway home did, in fact, sell according to Snohomish County records, the one that was formerly owned by Future Hope Revocable Living Trust.

WOODWAY PARK ESTATES BLK 000 D-00 - LOT 6

sale date
01/19/2016
entry date
02/16/2016
recording date
01/19/2016 
recording number
sale amount
$1,430,000.00
excise number
1095883 
deed type

transfer type

grantor (seller)
DOWNS FAMILY REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST 
grantee (buyer)
MAZZARELLA ANTHONY & AMY 
other parcels
No

But the trustee for the Downs Family Revocable Living Trust wasn't Mark Driscoll.  So in a sense it wasn't Driscoll's house in the sense of documentable ownership.  In a far more literal sense it certainly wasn't Mark Driscoll's house in Seattle that had sold a bit more than a year prior to Driscoll's February 2016 sermon. 

Why does this stuff matter?  Perhaps it matters because a guy like Mark Driscoll wanting to tell young men to take responsibility and not be cowards doesn't come across like he displayed a lot of courage telling a KOMO report "sorry, wrong address. I don't know" in a way that let all of us here Pastor Mark deny being at the address and then a few months later regales a conference audience about how "the media blocked the driveway" or a helicopter scared one of his sons and there were rocks being thrown.  Okay, these things can be confirmed ... at some place in Woodway that Driscoll wouldn't confirm was his to Russ Bowen.  The incidents invoked suggested that even with the tepid denial from someone who sounds just like Mark Driscoll plenty of people knew the house in Woodway was his.

If Mark Driscoll plans to discuss how and why he and his family came to the place of planting The Trinity Church in Arizona and intends to reuse material he's shared on the road at church conferences or in sermons in Wenatchee then we can keep some accounting of what he's said so far and compare that with available county records to see how clear or vague he's been.

A passing thought in conclusion, there might be people who watched that Charisma House video and declared that Grace Driscoll is a Stepford Wife.  That's the kind of lazy tagging that is typical of people on the internet.  No, I don't think Grace Driscoll is necessarily a Stepford wife.  Even if she is that's not what was on display in the recent Charisma House video.  It makes more sense to propose that what Grace Driscoll was doing was public relations.  After all, it's what she trained to do.

http://thetrinitychurch.com/local-ministry-leaders-and-staff/

Grace Driscoll has spent her entire life in ministry. Her mom and dad planted The Trinity Church in Seattle, Washington before she was born. She grew up serving in the nursery at her father’s church. Before graduating with her bachelors degree in Public Relations from the Edward R. Murrow of Communications, Grace married her high school sweetheart Mark, who is her best friend.

Today, Grace is the mother of five wonderful children who all love Jesus. She has co-authored the book Real Marriage with Mark, and together they have appeared on ABC Nightline, Loveline with Dr. Drew, Fox and Friends, as well as The View with Barbara Walters. She has also joined her husband in answering questions at conferences around the nation and world, most often addressing issues for women related to their identity in Christ and how to be a godly woman, wife, mother, and friend.
Grace helped her husband plant The Trinity Church in Scottsdale, Arizona, named in honor of her parents as her dad has gone home to be with the Lord. At The Trinity Church, Grace leads the Flourish Women’s Ministry. In her free time, Grace likes finding good deals on shoes, spending time with her family, and catching up with friends.


...

Not everyone has the greatest job in the world and I wouldn't want to do public relations myself, but if public relations for her husband is part of the job of being married to Mark Driscoll Grace seems to understand by now what comes with that set of tasks. 

One of which may be further discussing how they ended up in Arizona after decades of being in Seattle and having co-founded what used to be Mars Hill Church.



 

Thursday, April 05, 2018

co-founder of Studio Ghibli director Isao Takahata dead at 82


http://www.indiewire.com/2018/04/isao-takahata-dead-dies-studio-ghibli-grave-of-the-fireflies-1201949581/

The co-founder of Studio Ghibli and the director of such films as Grave of the Fireflies, Only Yesterday, Pom Poko, and The Tale of the Princess Kaguya has died at 82.

For want of a better way to put this, Takahata made films that were like the earth to Miyazaki's sky.  His films aren't suffused with quite the same apocalyptic fantasy as Miyazaki's works but they seem no less stepped in folklore, most obviously in the case of Kaguya

His films don't soar, they plod, but they plod with purpose.  Obviously that sort of film-making is not going to be for everyone.  Grave of the Fireflies is a harrowing, numbing vignette of two children who basically starve to death in the wake of the firebombing of Tokyo after being ostracized by their surviving relatives and neighbors for failing to do what is expected of them to contribute to the war effort.  It's a bleak and desolate film that is in many respects far easier to respect than to love, and even among makers of anime not everyone has had nice things to say about it (Oshii comes to mind).

Only Yesterday is, in a word, about farming, about the relationship of humans to the land in Japan during the 1980s.  It's a rumination on how urban life and its sprawl can lead people to set aside traditional agricultural life but with a twist in the last third observing how this dissociation is sufficiently complete that the woman who is the central character of the film goes out to work on a farm for a while, thinking she's going to be in touch with nature, only to slowly and steadily learn how everything around her has been cultivated by farmers.  The relationship between people and the land is more symbiotic and constant than it is in the imagination of city-dwellers who think they can go somewhere and be some place that is somehow "untouched" by human toil.  This is a quotidian film and it's jarring if you're used to Studio Ghibli films that more literally and figuratively soar (i.e. Nausicaa, for instance, or Porco Rosso)

Kaguya was, if memory serves, the last film Takahata directed and the whole work is like a giant David Lean-style epic conveyed through water color.  It's a placid and slow-moving film even by Takahata's standards and there was simply no way that the film was going to get any notice at all from the Academy in comparison to entries from Disney/Pixar. 

I'm afraid I can't commend the last project he was connected with that I can recall, The Red Turtle, though he didn't direct that film.  While he's hardly as well known as his colleague Hayao Miyazaki his work is worth checking out if you haven't already.   

Tuesday, April 03, 2018

Mark and Grace Driscoll discuss the forthcoming Spirit-Filled Jesus in a 25 minute video on Youtube that went up yesterday

the big announcement ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLiJsH4yuiI&feature=youtu.be

Twenty-five minutes in which to announce Driscoll's next book, Spirit-Filled Jesus.

https://wenatcheethehatchet.blogspot.com/2018/03/mark-driscoll-makes-deal-with-charisma.html

That's old news, nearly a monthly old, as it goes, but the twenty-five minute video that dropped yesterday is full of excitement.

For the time being you can cut and paste the link if you want to go watch the whole 25 minute thing. 

As noted earlier, the prospect of Mark Driscoll writing a book called Spirit-Filled Jesus seems unnecessary even within the context of a charismatic or Pentecostal approach.  The idea that nobody's ever done a book "like this" before seems hard to take seriously, impossible, in fact.

It's not like within Pentecostal or charismatic contexts there's no such book as Gordon Fee's God's Empowering Presence where he went through all the texts that refer to the Holy Spirit. But then Driscoll at one point seemed to think it was new and innovative to come up with a sermon series book before the sermons were going to be preached ... as if writing sermons in advance was daring or innovative?  Some scholars think that the letter to the Hebrews is more accurately thought of as a sermon written in advance, so if that's the case we could say that sermons written in advance of the preaching is so old as to literally date back to a biblical document. 

update
4-4-2018
06.40pm

At about 923 views with seven upvotes and twenty-five downvotes it's not looking like the video from Charisma House is going viral. 

For those who may have watched the video and wondered what comments referencing Driscoll's comments about women as "penis homes" could be, go over here.

https://wenatcheethehatchet.blogspot.com/2014/07/the-raw-text-no-pun-intended-of-william.html

The text of a few pages of "Using Your Penis" by Mark Driscoll on the old Mars Hill php discussion forum known as Midrash went up July 29, 2014.  Also included was a screen cap of the html formatting for the initial conversations sparked by "Using Your Penis".

For a comparison of what Driscoll wrote in 2000 as William Wallace II in "Using Your Penis" to what he wrote and said later in contexts such as Real Marriage, go over here.

https://wenatcheethehatchet.blogspot.com/2014/08/real-marriage-in-january-2012-and.html

UPDATE
4-5-2018
06.53pm

RNS picked up the story, of course. 

 
 
...
 
Driscoll explains how “Spirit-Filled Jesus” was inspired by his own experience pastoring individuals with various painful and practical problems.
 
“People often turn to self-help, and self-help, quite frankly, is of no help,” said Driscoll. “What we need is the Spirit’s help. The Holy Spirit empowered the life of Jesus. Jesus sends the Holy Spirit to empower our lives so we can overcome the same obstacles, live by His power and walk in his freedom and joy and that includes our emotional health, our relational health, our family and our ministry. ‘Spirit-Filled Jesus’ is an incredibly practical book that is rooted in deep biblical principles.”
 
Driscoll says the book also includes some painful parts of his and Grace’s own story that culminated in their family planting The Trinity Church in Scottsdale, Arizona.
 
If there are any stories about a helicopter above the Driscoll house and a little buddy getting his Airsoft to defend the family against bad guys ... can Russ Bowen get a complementary copy to review that explains how it was not, sorry, wrong address, I dunno?  
 
 
Though back in 2014 the reply was "sorry, wrong address, I don't know." By 2015 ... that house may have turned into a house that "was" Mark Driscoll's house when he was talking at the Thrive Conference. Transcript provided courtesy of Warren Throckmorton.
 
 
Flashforward a bit ...
 
 
In 2016 Driscoll preached a sermon in which he mentioned something that happened to the house that he initially told Bowen was some kind of wrong address back in 2014.  Since ...
 
 
is a dead link ...
 
we'll have to settle for a transcript we made back in 2016 of the sermon when it was available to download.
 
http://www.gracecitychurch.com/sermon/becoming-a-godly-man/
10.00
...
I put my house on the market. I'm thinking, "Okay, my house will sell." I gotta go down and I'm--we can't get the kids into school. The school's are already full. We're there too late because the school districts are different between the northwest and the southwest. We're renting a place temporarily. All my stuff, all our stuff, is up in our place in Seattle. Our house is on the market. Our house is not selling. ...


10.35
and I was in Arizona trying to figure out what the next season of life looks like with elementary, junior high, high school, college and my phone alarm starts going off and I assume somebody broke in or whatever. So I send my realtor over. My realtor calls me and his voice is trembling and he sends me this photo. He said, "I'm standing at your house and here it is." [audience reaction of dismay, apparently at a photo] Yeah,that--that's my house. Or WAS my house. And a 200-foot tree fell on my house and crushed our bedroom. Our bed is under that rubble. If my wife and I were taking a nap at 1 o'clock on a Saturday we'd be dead.


So I flew up late at night. I go to the property all the power's out. I'm there with a flashlight. It's pouring down rain and I'm going through the rubble that is our home and I'm glad that nobody in my family died. And I'm thinking, "How--this is all my equity. This is what I was going to use to relocate and provide for my family. And, and here it is." And now I live in another state so how am I supposed to fix this?
...

11.55
I remember sitting at the house, actually, outside in the rain looking at what used to be my house.  I'm like, "Okay, Lord, this family is my responsibility." My stuff is in this house. My family is in another state. We don't have a permanent place to live. I can't find a school for my children. All of our equity and wealth is in a destroyed home and I'm unemployed. ...


13.05
And I remember just standing there in the rain just like, "Father, Dad, I need help now. I need wisdom. I need provision. I need a path forward. I accept responsibility for the well-being of my family. But how to proceed forward, Dad, I'm not entirely clear on. I could really use your help." And God's a good father and he has answered that prayer and He's taken care of our family. And, actually, the good news is we closed this  house last week and it got fixed and somebody bought it who was willing to take that off our hands and allow us to move forward with our lives.
 
It needs to be kept in mind that while Driscoll used the word "Seattle" the actual house he at one point had in Montlake went on the market in 2014.  It sold in December 2014 according to Redfin.
 
So it wasn't Mark Driscoll's house on 2904 Montlake Blvd E in 2015.  But if Driscoll were referring to the house in Woodway in a different county than the King County location of the actual Seattle house ... that just gets us back to what the qualms were about telling Bowen he had the right address but that Driscoll didn't want to comment.  Now it's good nobody in his family died or even got hurt, but Driscoll's evasiveness with Bowen about whether or not it was the right address is not something that the Mark Driscoll who talked to Mother Jones twenty years ago is going to be able to just live down.
 
...
 
By setting themselves up against their elders, postmoderns are ingeniously adding an anti-establishment spirit to their movement. "I really preach; it's not just three points to a better self-esteem," Driscoll says. "Megachurches have perfect services with perfect lighting. We're a friggin' mess." Driscoll delivers his sermons largely off-the- cuff, and refuses to follow a point-by-point outline like most pastors at megachurches do. "I'm very confrontational," he says, "not some pansy-ass therapist."
...
 
That was twenty years ago. Obviously things change. Sometimes what changes is the substance of the stories said for the record.